Some of our sliding barn door faves | KV - Knape & Vogt

Some of our sliding barn door faves

Sep 07, 2017

If you haven't noticed, the interior barn door is a big deal these days. It's no mystery why. A sliding barn door is the ultimate space saver, especially in a small bath or bedroom where swinging doors take up valuable space. They can make a striking transition from one room to another — think of sliding open a grand, wide door between the front hall and livingroom, or a gracious bi-part door between living room and formal dining room.

But these sliding wonders are useful in so many ways besides as an entry from one room to another. As we noted here, designers of spaces from offices to restaurants are using rolling barn doors for their beauty and practical function alike.

So we've searched the web for examples we love. We hope you agree with our choices!

(Use the arrows to click through all 10 images)

Of course, HOUZZ is the go-to site for everything to do with house and home design. The article above ranks high with us for barn door ideas — we like the more unusual uses best!

What's better suited to the tiny house trend than a space-saving barn door? Loving this rolling door combo that serves as two walls of the tiny bathroom in this tiny house designed by Austin, Texas-based interior designer Kim Lewis. [Found on Lonny.com]

Here's a beautiful use of rolling barn doors—to hide a functional area in a small(ish) room. [Found on Vanderhorn Architects.com]

A sliding glass barn door in this bathroom shows off a gorgeous expanse of tile -- a homeowner's dream. [Found on krownlab.com]

Another great example of using a sliding barn door to hide/separate one functional space from another. Here, the office can be closed as needed for privacy. The hardware and large paneled door become a focal point for the overall rustic styling. Found on [Homedit.com]

Last but not least-loved—nestled into a nook in the wall of the garage, this grill is tucked behind a bi-part sliding barn door.  Perfect for protecting it from the weather while keeping it out of sight. [Found on Kitchn.com.]